Chatham Kent Wind Action Group website with photo of windmills and a marsh
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RESEARCH

Environmental

While wind power is a renewable and clean way to produce power, it is unfortunate that many misinterpret this as equating to a saving in greenhouse gas emissions, and/or being good for the environment. Remember that conventional power plants must always run on standby to accomodate the intermittent wind power. It is important to note that we already have reliable, clean energy in many areas. For example, both nuclear and hydro power produce no additional greenhouse gas emissions and are very reliable. When dealing with large industrial wind turbines, there are many additional environmental factors that must be investigated. The links below offer reliable and up-to-date scientific research, articles, reports, and papers that deal with the environmental concerns of large industrial wind turbines.

Noise

Noise from large industrial wind turbines is typically associated with the audible sound spectrum (noise that is heard by humans). However, noise from wind turbines is much more complicated and encompasses many different separate concerns. Noise can be attributed to many different health concerns, and decreases quality of life for nearby residents.

Wildlife

Any type of industrial facility can have profound affects on surrounding wildlife, or on migratory wildlife. Large industrial wind turbines are no different. They can pose significant threats to all kinds of wildlife.

Planning Studies

Proper planning relating to the planning of industrial wind generating facilities must take place at all levels of government, in addition to the necessary planning that should be expected from individual developers. If proper planning is in place (ie. setbacks, noise guidelines, etc.), the numerous problems with large industrial tubines can largely be avoided.